Cinderella

HERE TO SET A SPARK IN YOUR HEART AND A SPARKLE IN YOUR EYE… THE WORLD’S BEST-LOVED STORY… TOLD WITH DISNEY’S WIZARDRY!

Cinderella, who’s lost her parents, has no choice but to work as a maid for her wicked stepmother; a ball at the royal palace becomes her chance to escape… One of the most classic Disney fairy tales was meant to remind audiences of the successful Snow White (1937) – the studio was in need of a hit. That’s what they got, even if the film is far less interesting than anything Disney made in the 1940s. Cinderella and her Prince Charming are really too bland, but the supporting characters (including a bunch of merry mice) make up for that – as well as irresistible songs that are both beautiful and playful.

1950-U.S. Animated. 74 min. Color. Produced by Walt Disney. Directed by Wilfred Jackson, Hamilton Luske, Clyde Geronimi. Story: Charles Perrault. Songs: Mack David, Jerry Livingston, Al Hoffman (”A Dream is a Wish Your Heart Makes”, ”The Work Song”, ”Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo”). Voices of Ilene Woods (Cinderella), Eleanor Audley (Lady Tremaine), Rhoda Williams (Drizella), Lucille Bliss, Verna Felton, Mike Douglas.

Trivia: Dinah Shore and Deanna Durbin were allegedly considered as Cinderella. Followed by two direct-to-DVD releases, starting with Cinderella II: Dreams Come True (2002). 

Last word: “Selling storyboards happened before we ever pinned them up on the board; our first storyboards were on the floor. Or, for that matter, what would amount to the storyboard would be the little thumbnails that I would make in the very earliest days. You’d have them on the table, and you’d point to them as the music went along, so Walt could get a feeling of the timing. I still had to sell the storyboard to Walt on ‘Cinderella’ (1950), on ‘Lady and the Tramp’ (1955) – we’d get the storyboards in the music room, and I’d make my changes. I’d take business out, I’d put business in, the layout men would make some roughs to indicate a bridge to something else, I’d take a section out here and put it back in up there, I’d take a whole section out in order not to have too much footage. Walt would have to be in on that, and you had to sell it. By ‘selling it,’ I simply mean putting over your idea so it can be understood, so that the feeling of it is there.” (Jackson, interview with Michael Barrier and Milton Gray)

 

IMDb

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