Greta Garbo and Melvyn Douglas in “Ninotchka” (1939). Photo: MGM

Review: NINOTCHKA

It’s a fascinating send-up of and contrast to the sober persona Greta Garbo spent the 1930s developing on screen.


Victor Sjöström and Tore Svennberg in “The Phantom Carriage”. Photo: SF

Review: THE PHANTOM CARRIAGE

Rarely had audiences seen a movie where the story was told in such a complex way, adding flashbacks within flashbacks.


Ralph Fiennes and Kristin Scott Thomas in “The English Patient”. Photo: Miramax

Review: THE ENGLISH PATIENT

Themes of love, sorrow and trust in times of great upheaval are delicately handled by Anthony Minghella in his adaptation of the novel.




Mia Goth and Anya Taylor-Joy in “Emma.”. Photo: Focus Features

Quick Take: EMMA.

Unremarkable, but pretty and appealing, much like the 1996 version. 


Jeanne Moreau, Henri Serre and Oskar Werner in “Jules and Jim”. Photo: Criterion

Review: JULES AND JIM

It remains one of the very best New Wave examples.


Rosie Perez, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Margot Robbie, Ella Jay Basco and Jurnee Smollett-Bell in “Birds of Prey”. Photo: Warner

Quick Take: BIRDS OF PREY

Ewan McGregor is a weak villain, but the movie has a cheeky attitude and offers a decent amount of kick-ass action.




“Happy Birthday”. Photo: Le Pacte

Quick Take: HAPPY BIRTHDAY

The film’s sense of humor and attempts at charm hit a brick wall.


George MacKay in “1917”. Photo: Universal

Review: 1917

It’s a thrilling and emotional film, throwing its protagonists (and us) from one hair-raising danger to the next.

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